PHOTO BY MING POON

Boise-based Winter Wildlands Alliance is seeking a part-time Program Administrator to join our team! We are looking for a self-starting, highly motivated individual with strong organizational skills who is also passionate about human-powered winter snowsports. The Program Administrator will be responsible for managing our CRM database, membership fulfillment, office administration and providing general program support. If you’d enjoy working collaboratively with our dynamic team to help promote and protect winter wildlands then we would love to hear from you! See full job description here. To apply, send cover letter and resume to Mark Menlove, mmenlove@winterwildlands.org

Alaska’s Chugach State Park. Photo by Katie Strong

Have you heard about the 52-year-old conservation program that has strong bipartisan support and is one of the most effective tools we have to protect public lands and improve recreation access, yet somehow is teetering on the edge of a cliff?

If you’ve never heard of the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) — or perhaps you have but you’re not totally sure what it is — you’re not alone. LWCF doesn’t draw a lot of headlines, except for times like now when we’re on the verge of losing it.

Congress created the LWCF in 1965, with the idea that we should use some of the revenue from offshore oil and gas drilling to protect areas from development and improve public access to public lands. Each year $900 million in off-shore drilling revenue goes into the Land and Water Conservation Fund. This money is available to federal, state, and local governments to purchase land, purchase easements across private land and water for public access, and to build and maintain recreation infrastructure.

Unfortunately, almost every year, Congress diverts much of this funding to other uses, leading to a substantial backlong in LWCF-eligible projects. Even so, LWCF has played a substantial role in protecting public lands and improving recreation opportunities across America for the past 5 decades.

Over the life of the program, LWCF has funded close-to-home recreation opportunities in all fifty states and every congressional district. From local swimming pools to state parks, river access sites and climbing crags to entirely new parcels of public land, LWCF has directed over $17 billion to public lands conservation and recreation since it was first enacted. Check out this Outdoor Alliance interactive map to learn more about the public lands and recreation opportunities LWCF has protected near you.

So what’s the problem? On September 30, LWCF will expire unless it is renewed by Congress. You can make a difference today, it’s easy! Congress is supportive of LWCF but has not prioritized voting on it yet. Take action today to tell Congress this program is a priority to you. We’ve made it super easy to send your lawmaker a message. Just use the form below!

 

Human-powered snowsports are an important part of the $887 BILLION outdoor recreation economy and the fastest growing segment of the winter outdoor recreation industry. With 16 MILLION annual participants, booming equipment expenditures and related tourism revenues, human-powered winter backcountry activities create jobs and bring income into rural economies while contributing to community development, quality of life, health, and public land conservation.

See below for the full report, compiled and written by Natalie Knowles. Or click here to download the pdf.

2018 Trends and Impact Report

Back in March we put out a Winter Recreation Survey asking you how you experience winter on public lands. The survey was produced to help Winter Wildlands Alliance and our land management partners better understand what kinds of human-powered winter recreation are happening on public lands and what the biggest threats might be to the ways we like to play. The deadline for submissions was May 31, 2018. 1376 of you responded. Kristie Van Voorst from Boulder, Colorado, was the lucky winner of an outrageous complete gear and outfit package from our friends at DPS, FlyLow and Native Eyewear! Stay tuned for the next one; it definitely pays to play!

Meanwhile here are some of the top results from that survey:


 


Outtakes

Here’s a list of some fun answers we couldn’t help but share:

How do you recreate in winter?

  • Walking the cat (not dog!)
  • Winter is normally the best time for non-winter sports, like climbing and biking, in Southern Utah.
  • Pond Hockey
  • SnowBall Fights
  • Scuba Diving

What are your top threats to winter recreation?

  • Damn chain rules going to the mountain
  • The Orange Man
  • Motivating our children
  • Dog Poop
  • Winter Wildlands Alliance

It Pays to Play!!

Kristie Van Voorst of Boulder, Colorado won this sweet set-up plus a pair of DPS Skis–just for filling out our survey! Don’t miss the next one!

Comments are now closed on the Eldorado NF winter travel plan.

The Eldorado National Forest failed to seriously consider and analyze any significant further restrictions on OSV use and actually proposed to open many popular and historic cross-country and backcountry ski zones to motorized use, over the concerns of skiers who value solitude and quiet winter wildlands.

The forest’s Proposed Action (Alternative 2) failed in a number of ways to comply with NEPA and the 2015 OSV Rule. It also proposed reversing historic protections and opens many important and longstanding non-motorized areas to snowmobiles, including Anderson Ridge, numerous traditionally non-motorized areas accessed from the Carson Pass corridor, the historic Van Vleck closure, and the area around the Ludlow Hut. Alternative 4 was even worse, proposing to allow snowmobiles in the Loon Lake winter recreation area, in the Caples Creek recommended wilderness area, in several semi-primitive non-motorized areas, and in the Round Top Biological/Geological Special Interest Area!

We suggested that the forest go back to the drawing board, as the Lassen had to do, to come up with a revised or supplemental DEIS with a broader range of alternatives. Short of that, we advocated for Alternative 3 as the only alternative that presented a clear-eyed vision for winter travel management that recognizes historically non-motorized areas, focuses OSV designations in zones where OSV use actually occurs, minimizes user conflict and acknowledges that not all parts of the forest receive sufficient snow for OSV recreation.

Click here for our full summary and analysis, maps and organizational comment letter.