Today, there’s big news that benefits everyone who loves getting outside, whether it’s to the backcountry or your local city park.

The Land and Water Conservation Fund, hailed as America’s best conservation program, will be reauthorized this week after expiring at the end of September. In its 50-year history, LWCF has helped build trails, parks, trailheads, and river put-ins, and other recreational facilities in all 50 states. If you love to play outside you have probably benefited from LWCF. Since its expiration in September, the outdoor recreation community and the larger conservation community have been raising a ruckus with policymakers about reauthorizing the fund.

Winter Wildlands Alliance members from across the country called and wrote their representatives and visited DC to tell policymakers why the Land and Water Conservation Fund matters. Thanks to the outpouring from our community and others, Congress included reauthorization of the program in its omnibus bill. In an incredibly tough political environment, we can count this as a huge success.

The program was reauthorized for 3 years at $450 million. The good news is that $450 million is 50% more than the fund has gotten in the last few years.  Of course, there is (always) more work to be done.  We had hoped for permanent reauthorization at $900 million. This means that there is more to do to get the program permanently reauthorized but this is a huge first step.

Every letter, call, and office visit ensured that this program stayed on Congress’s radar, and we have you to thank for that. With so much at stake, you made sure that Congress couldn’t afford to leave LWCF on the table. Without your help educating your representatives and making your priorities known, LWCF never would have made it through the gauntlet. There were an incredible number of other issues vying for a spot in the omnibus, so it’s a huge win that LWCF made it through.

To say we are stoked is an understatement.

Winter backcountry recreation is on the rise. Advances in backcountry skiing and snowboarding equipment, improved access and the relentless search for fresh snow, solitude and adventure have driven more people into the backcountry in recent years. As is so often the case, increased use can lead to greater impacts to the landscape as well as on others seeking the same experiences. Trash, human waste issues, excessive noise and disturbances to wildlife have all been cited as issues that can be addressed successfully with relevant Leave No Trace education.

In July of 2014 the Vermont Backcountry Alliance, a Winter Wildlands Alliance grassroots group, contacted the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics (the Center) about the development of a “winter backcountry code of ethics” for use in Vermont. They chose to align their proposed code with Leave No Trace to ensure a unified, science-based set of minimum impact guidelines.  After the Vermont-specific guidelines were completed, Winter Wildlands Alliance worked with the Center to adapt the Vermont guidelines as set of Leave No Trace practices for backcountry winter snowsports that would have more national relevance.

Through this collaboration, both Winter Wildlands Alliance and the Center are able to promote relevant and area-specific Leave No Trace information to help skiers, snowboarders, snowshoers, and others to enjoy the backcountry responsibly and safely. With backcountry winter use increasing, Leave No Trace information is imperative for ensuring long-term protection and stewardship of these shared lands. Because of the Center’s partnership with federal and state land managing agencies, this set of winter backcountry Leave No Trace practices is already vetted and approved for use on signs, maps, etc. and is the standard for recreating in our national parks, national forests and other public lands during winter.

The long version of the national guidelines are available for download here.  You can also download a “short” version, which is better suited for signs and other displays, here.

Theses guidelines are designed to be widely disseminated and heavily utilized by both land managers and the backcountry snowsports community. Appropriate uses of the guidelines include: signage, trailhead kiosks, backcountry access points from ski areas, websites, trail maps, guidebooks, etc.  For information on how the guidelines can be used, posted, reprinted or disseminated, please visit the Center’s website.

If you, other organizations, or your agency partners want to create signage, or other products using the guidelines, please contact Ben Lawhon at the Center for more information.

Right now, a battle is being waged over the West’s public lands, including many of the places we love to ski. Out-of-touch politicians backed by private interests like the American Lands Council want to transfer millions of acres of your land to states or private interests, a move that would almost certainly shut down your access to these beloved areas.

Public lands belong to all Americans. They are home to stunning landscapes and recreational opportunities that everyone can access. Together, Americans care for these special places, protecting them so that everyone can enjoy them, including the next generation.

Some politicians would like to sell off public lands to generate profit for individual states or private entities. Elected officials – state legislators and county commissioners – in 11 western states have written bills or passed resolutions proposing that individual states “take back” America’s parks, national forests, BLM lands, wildlife refuges, and open spaces, arguing that these lands and the profits that they generate should belong to the states. If their efforts were to be successful access to millions of acres of land would be lost, including some of the world’s most iconic backcountry ski destinations. Wyoming’s Teton Pass, Utah’s Wasatch, Turnagain Pass in Alaska, Colorado’s San Juan Mountains – these are just some of the countless peaks, passes, and ranges across the West being eyed for takeover.

If our public lands were sold to state governments, they would be the responsibility of state taxpayers to maintain and protect. State governments could privatize, sell, develop, or auction off our public lands to the highest bidder. Even if a state didn’t intend to sell off these lands it may not have a choice. A single wildfire can cost $100 million to fight. This expense would bankrupt most state budgets, forcing them to sell or auction off land to cover the costs. Imagine if the places you love to ski were suddenly privatized.

Although some state legislatures voted down land transfer bills, the idea of selling off public lands is gaining momentum. Most state legislatures have adjourned for now but in Congress, a symbolic amendment supporting the sale of public lands passed this spring. Just recently Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul stated that he supports relinquishing federal management of public lands. These actions challenge the foundation that underpins National Parks, National Forests, and public access to wild places. The Public Land Heist is the most serious threat that has faced our public lands in a generation.

If our mountains, forests, and rivers are privatized or sold off, there’s no replacing them. We need to speak now to protect the places we love to play. Winter Wildlands Alliance is working closely with our partners at Outdoor Alliance and other recreation and conservation groups to fight this legislation and ensure our public lands remain accessible to everyone.   Visit www.protectourpublicland.org to learn more and sign up for regular updates on our campaign to protect access to public lands.

The only way to keep our public lands in public hands is for the American people to speak up. If enough of us rally together, we can put an end to these terrible proposals and protect the incredible landscapes and backcountry areas we love. Please sign the petition and send a clear signal to your elected officials that America’s public lands are not for sale. By signing, you will become part of a growing movement of people who are working together to keep public lands public.

Curious which recreation areas are threatened in your state?

Alaska

Alaska

Arizona

Arizona

Colorado

Colorado

Idaho

Idaho

Montana

Montana

Nevada

Nevada

New Mexico

New Mexico

Oregon

Oregon

Utah

Utah

Washington

Washington

Wyoming

Wyoming

 

 

 

 

Photo courtesy of Jay Beyer Imaging

2015 GRASSROOTS ADVOCACY CONFERENCE

June 18-20 2015: American Mountaineering Center, Golden, Colorado

Our sixth Grassroots Advocacy Conference took place June 18-20, 2015 in Golden, CO.  This conference was an opportunity for individuals and organizations who care about winter recreation to gather to hear the latest on policy issues, network, share successes, and meet with land managers.

Our keynote speaker, Donny Roth, kicked off the conference on the evening of June 18. Donny is a Winter Wildlands Alliance ambassador, ski guide, sponsored athlete and free range skier who focuses on, and advocates for, human powered skiing. Additional presentations and seminars will range from effectively utilizing the new Over Snow Vehicle Rule to protect winter backcountry areas, to using maps as advocacy tools, to defining a set of ethics for the winter backcountry community.

To view a detailed conference agenda please click here
Notes

Notes from day 1 (Friday)

Notes from day 2 (Saturday)

Handouts and Materials

Winter Recreation Report,  2015

Best Management Practices for Forest Service Travel Planning, April 2015

Minimization Criteria Fact Sheet

Vail Pass Task Force Framework for Development

Vail Pass Winter Recreation Area Management Plan History

Vermont Backcountry Ethics – long version

Vermont Backcountry Ethics – short version

Conference Cosponsors  
obc logo
Black Diamond
TWS logo
BCM_2010_LOGO-MAG

 

Today is a big day for the future of balance in the backcountry. Almost 10 years after the Forest Service issued the Travel Management Rule – directing the management of wheeled-vehicle use, but making management of snowmobiles optional – we finally have a national rule that does the same for winter use. The long overdue Over-Snow Vehicle Rule was published in the Federal Register today and you can read it online here.

During the comment period on the draft rule, our community spoke out in unprecedented numbers and with overwhelming support for strengthening the rule. We’re pleased to report that the Forest Service heeded some of that public input by adopting a prohibited-unless-allowed approach to snowmobile use that is consistent with motorized management in other seasons, rather than the confusing “either/or” approach proposed in the draft rule.

We do still have several concerns with issues that remain in the final rule. Like the draft, the final rule allows for past management decisions to be incorporated into new travel plans without further opportunity for public involvement. While this makes sense for decisions that were done recently and with a full environmental review, we are concerned that this loophole will allow forests to sidestep the intent of travel management planning and scrape by with out-of-date decisions that avoid minimizing the impact of snowmobiles on wildlife, the environment, and non-motorized recreation.

In addition, a revised definition allowing a designated “area” for over-snow vehicle use to be nearly as large as an entire Ranger District is troubling in that it may result in snowmobiles and other over-snow vehicles continuing to dominate the winter landscape, posing serious threats to other users and to critical wildlife habitat.

Under the new rule, National Forests must designate specific roads, trails, and areas for snowmobile use and publish these designations on an Over-Snow Vehicle (OSV) use map. Once an OSV map is published, snowmobile use outside of designated areas and trails will be prohibited. Forests that already have snowmobile designations in place must also publish an OSV use map, and we expect to see many of these Forests publish maps for the 2015-2016 winter season.

By zoning different areas for motorized and non-motorized use, winter travel planning is an opportunity to bring local stakeholders and communities together to find balanced solutions for winter use. With the national framework in place, winter travel planning now transitions to place-based processes where local advocates are essential. As forests across the country begin to implement the new OSV Rule, Winter Wildlands Alliance will be leading the way and looking to you to help advocate for balanced opportunities for winter recreation in the places you visit.

We want to send out a giant Thank You to our community for all of their work and support over the past decade. This new opportunity is a direct result of 10 years of never-give-up effort by Winter Wildlands Alliance and our members. It wouldn’t exist without a strong community of people who value wild winter landscapes and the human-powered recreation opportunities such places provide. We aren’t finished yet but we now have a critical tool for bringing balance to the backcountry.